ADA website compliance is a hot topic among any business that has a website (and in today’s world, that really is 99% of them). You’ve likely seen news stories about companies that are getting sued or settling out of court for having a website that doesn’t comply with the American Disabilities Act and you’re also probably wondering if this affects you or your business.
You state the the owner is “not required to make changes that would create and undue financial or administrative burden.” Did you mean “not allowed” vs “not required?” I have not had a chance to talk with her as yet. I just need to know if she is required to allow us more time if we need it, due to the disabilities we have to accommodate. We are looking but we are limited as to what is functional for our needs. She wants to increase the rents in the units after the work is completed. Our current rent is $1482.00 but she will be asking about $2300.00 going forward. All four units in the building (2 upper, 2 lower with outside entrances, so no elevator) are 3 BR, 1 & 1/2 bath. As she did not offer to let us rent the other downstairs unit once it is completed, I can only assume she simply does not want to rent to us anymore, or perhaps she assumed we could not afford the new amount she wants. Please let me know if the ADA requires that special needs tenants be granted the time needed to relocate, rather than sticking to a strict schedule set by the property owner. Thank you.
In most cases, private businesses can’t be sued for damages, under the ADA, says Anastasia Protopapadakis, an ADA defense attorney with the Miami firm Gray-Robinson. Businesses are sued for attorney fees and compliance. Businesses who agree to settlements or lose their cases must pay attorney fees and agree to become ADA compliant within a set amount of time, she said. 
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^ Esshaki, Tiffany (July 21, 2015). "Remembering the 'Capitol Crawl'". C&G News. Retrieved January 15, 2016. The event, known as the "Capitol Crawl", was an image that legislators couldn't ignore, Bauer said. She had fought since the 1960s to legally protect the rights of people with disabilities, and with that heroic display, she said, lawmakers simply couldn't go back to their constituents without action.
LexisNexis® is now the exclusive third party online distributor of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® customers will be able to access and use ALM's content by subscribing to the LexisNexis® services via Lexis Advance®. This includes content from the National Law Journal®, The American Lawyer®, Law Technology News®, The New York Law Journal® and Corporate Counsel®, as well as ALM's other newspapers, directories, legal treatises, published and unpublished court opinions, and other sources of legal information.

Your website looks good, is functional and provides a great user experience. But, can a disabled person use it? Can a visually-impaired person understand what your photos and other non-text aspects of your website are and do? If not, you may need to make some changes or you may receive a letter from lawyers threatening Americans with Disability Act, or ADA, claims.

The ADA is a Civil Rights Law which requires that buildings and facilities that provide goods and services to the public, must be accessible to individuals with disabilities.  Buildings and alterations constructed after 1992 must comply with the requirements of the ADA.  Buildings and facilities constructed prior to 1992, are required to make changes to facilitate accessibility that are “readily achievable”, which is defined by the ADA as, “easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense.”


The California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) prohibits employment practices that discriminate against an applicant or employee on the basis of an actual or perceived physical or mental disability or medical condition, unless the condition prevents the employee from performing the essential functions of the job or affects the health and safety of the individual or fellow employees. FEHA also prohibits discrimination based on an individual's genetic information and harassment based on an actual or perceived protected characteristic. FEHA covers private employers with five or more employees and all public employers, except for the harassment provision that applies to all public and private employers, regardless of size (CA Gov. Code Sec. 12926).
ADA disabilities include both mental and physical medical conditions. A condition does not need to be severe or permanent to be a disability.[6] Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations provide a list of conditions that should easily be concluded to be disabilities: deafness, blindness, an intellectual disability (formerly termed mental retardation), partially or completely missing limbs or mobility impairments requiring the use of a wheelchair, autism, cancer, cerebral palsy, diabetes, epilepsy, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia.[7] Other mental or physical health conditions also may be disabilities, depending on what the individual's symptoms would be in the absence of "mitigating measures" (medication, therapy, assistive devices, or other means of restoring function), during an "active episode" of the condition (if the condition is episodic).[7]
Title III also has applications to existing facilities. One of the definitions of "discrimination" under Title III of the ADA is a "failure to remove" architectural barriers in existing facilities. See 42 U.S.C. § 12182(b)(2)(A)(iv). This means that even facilities that have not been modified or altered in any way after the ADA was passed still have obligations. The standard is whether "removing barriers" (typically defined as bringing a condition into compliance with the ADAAG) is "readily achievable", defined as "...easily accomplished without much difficulty or expense".

Enforcement of the ADA, is typically left to private individuals and by necessity their attorneys.  When an individual with a disability encounters a condition that inhibits their access or use of a building or facility in 49 states other than California, they are able to file suit and obtain correction of the condition.  If an individual with a disability encounters the same condition in California, they are immediately eligible for $4,000 in statutory damages under California’s Civil Code Section 52, which makes any violation of the ADA (no matter how small) a violation of an individual’s civil rights.  This has unfortunately created a significant cottage industry in California, where attorneys (operating under the umbrella of “facilitating access for the disabled”) will go after businesses with ADA violations, to simply pocket the $4,000 in statutory damages with an additional couple of thousand for attorney’s fees.
Let’s start with a bit of background. The Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted in 1990 to prohibit discrimination and ensure equal opportunity to people with disabilities. This applies to State and local government services, employment, commercial facilities, transportation, and places of public accommodation.[1] These laws can be enforced by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and through private lawsuits.
The other day the mall security in the mall I was shopping turned off the escalators. I am perminately handicapped and it is difficult for me to walk. So my wife asked the security officer to turn on the escalator and the reply was you have to walk to the end of the mall and use the elevator, once the escalator was turned off they could not turn it back on. Just looking for clarification if this considered harassment and or is against ADA guidelines
1:15 PM, Nov. 12, 2018: This story incorrectly says that nearly 5,000 ADA lawsuits were filed in federal court for alleged website violations in the first six months of 2018 and that 10,000 were projected to be filed by year’s end, up 30% from 2017. Those numbers actually refer to all ADA lawsuits for disability discrimination involving public accommodation filed in that period. Of those suits, lawsuits alleging website accessibility violations totaled 1,053 in the first six months, a number that is projected to rise to 2,000 by year’s end, up 90% from 2017.
The question of fixing the elevator is an entirely different matter (and one with which I am personally struggling in my own home), depends on local building codes and the specifics of the building, and you will need to start with the local building department to see if there is any way to get the situation rectified if the landlord is unresponsive.
We are starting a project in an residential area that does not have existing sidewalks, we will have a backhoe working on the road digging holes what types of signage and how are we to deal with the ada requirements in an area that doesn’t have pre-existing sidewalks or a clearly delineated path? We want to be safe and comply. Thank you for your time
We have some accessibility issues with the sidewalks and telephone poles that are in the center of the walks. This does not allow for a wheelchair to travel on the sidewalk. Also, the walks have huge cracks so there are different levels in the walk. In addition, at one point wheel chairs must circumvent blockage by traveling into the street which has a 45 mph speed limit. Is there a source to let the city know they need to do corrections? Is this an ADA non-compliance issue?
The new CBC accessibility requirements for EVCS specifically identify that each EVCS, whether or not accessible, provided with a point-of-sale device must provide a tactilely discernable numerical keypad, like a push-button telephone keypad or some other technology such as RFID, biometric fingerprint or other mechanism that allows access and privacy (see CBC Section 11B-707.9.1).
Government Code §11546.7 – The requirement that state agency heads certify, every two years, that their agency’s website meets the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, Version 2.0 or a subsequent version, at Level AA or higher, and the requirements of Sections 11135 and 7405 of the Government Code. Created by AB 434 (Baker, Chapter 780, Statutes of 2017), and sometimes referred to as AB 434.
DSA is not aware of any efforts to amend the California Green Code in this manner. While the California Green Code nonresidential mandatory measures require projects to identify an EV space, provide an electrical raceway to the service panel, and provide adequate capacity at the service panel for future EVCS; good design practice would be to incorporate appropriate ground surfaces and routes to facilitate the later installation of usable accessible EVCS. Plans and specifications must accurately describe the full extent of the work to be performed. Some enforcement jurisdictions (primarily city- and county building departments) may have additional requirements.

Yes, all websites must have hand rails in the rest rooms, ramps in lieu of front porch stairs and elevators with doors wide enough for wheelchairs to be easily loaded into them. Seriously though, ADA only covers Americans, and the Internet is hardly just an American institution. Besides, browsers can already be configured to override the web designer’s pre-configured fonts, font sizes, font and page and page background colors, etc, to make it much easier to read. Also, the big 3 Operating Systems (MS Windows, MAC, and Linux) have text-to-speech programs which will allow the computer to read...
When a property owner hits the 20% cost limitation on path of travel improvements, the jurisdictional entity cannot require further improvements to the path of travel to occur. The property owner should be advised, however, that for older facilities that pre-date the ADA, barrier removal is required by the ADA. Barrier removal, however, will not be enforced by the local jurisdictional entity.
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